Arguing about cuddly cats and ‘going TOO far’

25 Jul

Random question:   Is it true that some cats make good pets’?  This was a claim or CONCLUSION from last time when we were examining an argument.  We had started labeling & analyzing the argument about ‘roads that lead to Rome’ and got side-tracked by CATS! (see to the right:  ‘Spotting errors in arguments, beginning steps’

Your HW was to practice LABELING the following syllogism:

All animals that make good pets cuddle well

Some cats cuddle well

Tf, some cats make good pets  

 

Do you remember the steps?

1.   Put each proposition in ‘logical form’

All animals that make good pets are animals that cuddle well (needed a copula and we CLARIFIED terms)

Some cats are animals that cuddle well

Tf, some cats are animals that make good pets

2.   Start labeling the terms ‘bottom- up’, beginning with the Conclusion

–      Subject term is:   cats

–      Predicate or MAJOR term is:  animals that make good pets

–      Middle term (what’s left over) is: animals that cuddle well

 3.   Evaluate the terms with some quick questions

–      Are there 3 and only 3 terms?  YES

–      Is the Middle term in just the P1 and P2? (a rule new to you today) YES 

–      Is the Major/ Predicate term in P1? (the major premise -can’t be in P2) YES

 4.  Here’s a new step – draw out the syllogism to see if we have enough info to come to the conclusion legitimately

 cats as good pets

Because we have a question of where to place that subset of ‘cats that make good pets‘ (in the blue circle or out of the blue circle), we CANNOT legitimately reach the conclusion that Some cats are animals that make good pets.   Visually we can SEE that the syllogism is NOT valid…so there is no point in continuing  to debate with a cat/cuddly pet disputer whether the argument is true, because he/she has NOT correctly formed a syllogism.

Had the syllogism BEEN valid, then we would have continued on to examine the truth of Premise 1 and Premise 2.  There is a logic law that states, “In a valid argument, if the 2 premises are true, the conclusion MUST be true.”  That IF is the crucial two-letter word. Today’s argument was NOT valid, for there was insufficient information in the 2 premises to determine if in fact SOME CATS ARE ANIMALS THAT MAKE GOOD PETS.

So, for next time, practice with the argument from our previous post, the one below.  See if you can draw it out like I did with the cat argument.

All roads lead to Rome

Old Cabin Cove is a road

Therefore, Old Cabin Cove leads to Rome

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