Logical Gal asks which is better – good Qs or good answers?

20 Nov

Would you rather be known as someone who has discerning answers or someone who asks  discerning questions? 

I think that people often feel embarrassed when they ask a question.  They might even feel stupid for not knowing something.  And on the other side, I think that some people actually feel superior when they impart knowledge, that having the “so-called right answer”  is necessary for them.

Recently I have seen the value in being able and willing to articulate thought-filled questions.

My husband is much more a science-math person than I am. So when he is explaining a new idea, I often am at a loss for even having a category or context to place some of the concepts he’s attempting to communicate.

Yet when I make the effort to sort out enough of what I can understand, I can then see ahead to ASK a question. Usually my first questions have to do with distinctions.  If he says, reverberant functions* give us the mean in the solution set”, then I will ask an initial question that helps me see the category:

  • Are there other functions besides ‘reverberant’ ?
  • What else do reverberant functions do?
  • What other data could these reverberant functions GIVE?
  • Where else do reverberant functions occur?
  • Can anything else be considered reverberant?
  • What actually does reverberant mean?
  • Are there other sets beside solutions sets?

But formulating questions take effort.  Alas, ALL thinking takes effort. That’s why it’s so rare.

What about those who have answers?  Wouldn’t you feel empowered and more secure just by knowing you had the right answers?

Actually, that kind of self-satisfaction can be limiting.  It can kill curiosity.  And it encourages pride. Now I’m sure you are both wary of pride and drawn to the confidence that pride imparts.

I maintain, however, that intellectual humility is actually a better character trait to hone.  These days, I’m far more impressed with those who ask the questions that never would have occurred to me.

Just like we can strengthen musical and athletic skills and talents by effective coaching, motivating examples and constant practice, I think we can also get better at initiating and formulating questions.

How about challenging yourself to create questions whenever you’re listening to a report, a presentation, an explanation, a sermon, or any kind of talk.

You won’t be bored!

*reverberant functions are just two words I cobbled together

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