Logical Girl does NOT beg the question

25 Feb

Pet Peeves, we all have them!

Pet Peeves

When it comes to grammar usage, my ire-raiser is when people misuse LESS and FEWER.  The following example is my g0-to reminder of proper usage:

  • This cookie might have less fat, but it does not have fewer calories.

If you can COUNT items, you must use ‘fewer’.  If you can’t count the substance, choose ‘less’.  How difficult is that?

And when it comes to logic, I get irked when people incorrectly use the expression to beg the question to mean to raise the question or to wonder about something.

According to a useful website About this fallacy ‘begging the question’ is:

  • a logic term….used to indicate that someone has made a conclusion based on a premise that lacks support

If I say, Susie is unskilled as a bookkeeper because she lacks accounting skills, then I have just restated my opinion/conclusion instead of providing reasons or proof.  No skill in bookkeeping is very close to a lack of accounting skills.  I haven’t built any case at all.  I have simply reworded my conclusion.  My duty still awaits; I must prove my point with reasons and evidence.

Here’s another example, incorrectly using this logical fallacy:

  • Sugar, which comes from juice squeezed from harvested sugar beets or sugarcane, must be good for you because it grows in nature.

We haven’t actually shown that substances derived from natural plants ARE good for one.  The first counter example that comes to mind are certain types of mushrooms, which although ‘natural’, are most definitely poisonous.

Voilà a few examples of this logical error, ‘Begging the Question’.  Of course we should strive to argue correctly, but more importantly, I’m advocating an accurate USE of the English language to avoid confusion.

Just so you know, I don’t ‘buy’ the possible comeback that language evolves, that as soon as a word or phrase comes to be accepted by many, then it has a new legitimized meaning.

Question:  What do YOU think about sticking to the formal meaning of a word or phrase versus going with the tide of general usage?

2 Responses to “Logical Girl does NOT beg the question”

  1. Ben Kruse March 4, 2015 at 11:44 pm #

    Is Legitimatized a word? Just kidding, what is your reasoning behind the thought that a word incorrectly used is not a word re-defined?

    • Maria March 5, 2015 at 10:25 am #

      I think we need to hold ourselves and others firm to an established definition. But a more important principle is that at the start of a discussion, we must clarify terms and establish agreement. If both parties disagree on what a term means, then a subsequent discussion would be futile.
      Thanks for catching my ‘legitimatized’ – I’ll fix it!

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