Tag Archives: Cats

Logical Gal and Reasoning like a Doctor

10 Oct

One of our cats died this week:

What a painful decision it is to choose to euthanize an animal when her quality of life is rapidly going down hill.  For years this cat had suffered from a chronic malady.  We struggled with her as we tried different remedies suggested by the vet.  But in the end, there was nothing more we could do.  At the ripe old age of 17 1/2 her organs were too weak to respond to medicine.

As we were chatting awkwardly with the vet who was getting to administer that final drug, I realized that the trial and error solutions that he and previous professionals had suggested were examples of abductive reasoning.

In language-based logic, there are 3 ways of reasoning: deductive, inductive and abductive.

Deductive reasoning is when you go from 2 known truths to a new piece of information.

All cats are curious

Leia is a cat

Therefore, Leia is curious

If the first two premises are true in a correctly formed syllogism (called ‘valid’ ) , then it follows that the conclusion must be true.  The conclusion is, in effect, GUARANTEED to be true. 

Inductive reasoning is more probabilistic.  The conclusion is at best LIKELY to be true.

The hurricane is moving in a northeasterly direction at the rate of 15 miles per hour.

Therefore, if it continues at that same rate and heading, it will probably reach our city by tomorrow night. 

Now to the thought process used by doctors, scientists and detectives.

Abductive reasoning is when you gather evidence and draw the best and most ‘reasonable’ (i.e. based on reasons) conclusion!  Many people rely on this kind of decision-making.  So much of life is uncertain.  But we gather the facts as best we can and we propose a solution or a conclusion. It’s trial and error.  Many of the decisions we take MUST rely on abductive reasoning.  I know this is frustrating to Americans who crave and are almost addicted to having certainty.

It is important, therefore, that you trust the character and procedures of the one who is reasoning this way.  Our cat did die, but all the vets involved in her life worked diligently and with care to provide the best treatments.  We are grateful to them and to God who guided us in that final decision as her owners.

Arguing about cuddly cats and ‘going TOO far’

25 Jul

Random question:   Is it true that some cats make good pets’?  This was a claim or CONCLUSION from last time when we were examining an argument.  We had started labeling & analyzing the argument about ‘roads that lead to Rome’ and got side-tracked by CATS! (see to the right:  ‘Spotting errors in arguments, beginning steps’

Your HW was to practice LABELING the following syllogism:

All animals that make good pets cuddle well

Some cats cuddle well

Tf, some cats make good pets  

 

Do you remember the steps?

1.   Put each proposition in ‘logical form’

All animals that make good pets are animals that cuddle well (needed a copula and we CLARIFIED terms)

Some cats are animals that cuddle well

Tf, some cats are animals that make good pets

2.   Start labeling the terms ‘bottom- up’, beginning with the Conclusion

–      Subject term is:   cats

–      Predicate or MAJOR term is:  animals that make good pets

–      Middle term (what’s left over) is: animals that cuddle well

 3.   Evaluate the terms with some quick questions

–      Are there 3 and only 3 terms?  YES

–      Is the Middle term in just the P1 and P2? (a rule new to you today) YES 

–      Is the Major/ Predicate term in P1? (the major premise -can’t be in P2) YES

 4.  Here’s a new step – draw out the syllogism to see if we have enough info to come to the conclusion legitimately

 cats as good pets

Because we have a question of where to place that subset of ‘cats that make good pets‘ (in the blue circle or out of the blue circle), we CANNOT legitimately reach the conclusion that Some cats are animals that make good pets.   Visually we can SEE that the syllogism is NOT valid…so there is no point in continuing  to debate with a cat/cuddly pet disputer whether the argument is true, because he/she has NOT correctly formed a syllogism.

Had the syllogism BEEN valid, then we would have continued on to examine the truth of Premise 1 and Premise 2.  There is a logic law that states, “In a valid argument, if the 2 premises are true, the conclusion MUST be true.”  That IF is the crucial two-letter word. Today’s argument was NOT valid, for there was insufficient information in the 2 premises to determine if in fact SOME CATS ARE ANIMALS THAT MAKE GOOD PETS.

So, for next time, practice with the argument from our previous post, the one below.  See if you can draw it out like I did with the cat argument.

All roads lead to Rome

Old Cabin Cove is a road

Therefore, Old Cabin Cove leads to Rome