Tag Archives: Education

Follow reason, not the heart in making a decision

9 Dec

My husband used to be in sales  – the kind whose products were invisible and long term.  Life insurance, college accounts, emergency savings, although worthy goals, couldn’t hold a candle to the allure of a shiny new car.  What he learned was that despite a couple’s acquiescence to the need for financial protection, that pure desire for a new car exerted a stronger pull.

new car

The husband would be the one to enumerate all the reasons why the family needed this new van.  Reality taught my husband the truth of the adage: People buy emotionally and justify their purchase rationally. 

My daughter-in-law and her husband face a decision, like all parents, of how to educate their oldest child.  Over the past two years, Anne has considered home-schooling with much turmoil.  She has felt her heart pulled toward this paradigm for various reasons, but last year she enrolled our grandson in pre-school.  At the time, it was the right decision.  The family moved over the summer and they found a 4-year old preschool in their new city.  But the tug to homeschool has grown stronger.

Decision-making is challenging for all of us.   It doesn’t help that in today’s ‘Disney-fied’ world we are counseled to ‘follow our heart’!

Christians should know that according to God, our hearts cannot be trusted.  Only as these hearts are being renewed by the Holy Spirit and informed by a Bible-saturated mind that considers, weighs and evaluates all things can they be trusted.

The other challenge to wading through options is the oppression of the majority.  I’m surprised, yet I shouldn’t be, when I encounter people  who seem to assume that if a majority of people in their country think XYZ, then it must be true.  Where is THAT assumption grounded on?

All Logical Joes and Janes recognize that view as a bald-faced fallacy – Argumentum Ad Populum.  The holders of this view automatically assume minority dissenters must be wrong.

So back to Anne and her recent decision process to switch to homeschooling.  My husband and I have long thought that this couple are well-suited to homeschool.  Furthermore, we have confidence in parents’ ability to equip and guide their children just as well, if not better, than outsourced educational institutions.

As someone who supports critical thinking, I am encouraging Anne to think through her reasons FOR this change.  If the benefits to her and to their children outweigh other options, then she should choose home-schooling.  Her husband, our son, absolutely supports his wife in whichever educational choice she opts for.  She is a full-time mom to their two kids and is the one whose day-to-day responsibilities center on raising the family.

As we talked about this over Thanksgiving Anne gave vent to the real pressure from the world, seeped in ‘majority knows best’ thinking.  But trying to please extended family or current pre-school teachers or friends who evince surprise and trot out, “But what about the social aspect N would be missing?” should carry no weight against researched reasons that matter to the couple.

What about the heart?

Follow your heart

When I mentioned to Anne that Christians are counseled NOT to let feelings and emotions guide our decisions, she balked a bit.  I know that what grounds her reaction is that she truly feels that God has given her the desire to homeschool.  And I don’t discount that.  Maybe we’re using different words.  I might say about a decision: “I don’t feel any check from the Holy Spirit,” thereby giving weight to the ‘affective’ aspect of my choice.

A more effective final check might be for Anne to review the purpose they see for educating their children.  Then they can evaluate if homeschooling is the correct and best course to meet that goal all the while guided by their values.  Decision-making MUST start with the end in sight and progress backwards.  I offer that when Anne articulates their vision for their children as young adults and then looks at the options for their family, she can feel peace about her decision.

Logical Gal and the value of repetition

11 Dec

I had a student at my old school who often repeated the Latin truism, that repetition is the mother of learning

It follows that we shouldn’t be discouraged when it takes us so long to acquire/absorb a new idea to the degree that it actually changes us.  Hearing something once, 5 times or even 20 times often isn’t enough for the concept or new nugget of information to stick.

I  teach French.  It’s often said that students need to hear a new phrase up to 70 times for that phrase to be IN them, so that it comes out effortlessly.  So why should it be any different with ideas?

All this is to say, that last week I was GREATLY encouraged when I caught myself asking 4 of my favorite words, ” As opposed to what?”  This was a first for me – and something I have wanted to be able to think spontaneously.

I was reading in Romans and came across Paul’s statement:

  • For God is my witness, whom I serve with my spirit in the gospel of his Son, (Romans 1:9)

My happy first reaction was to ask myself, “How else could he be serving God? – if not with his spirit, then with what?” In essence, I had automatically asked those 4 words, “as opposed to what”!

Up until now, I have been able to notice, AFTER THE FACT, when other authors move in that direction.  They are then able to make a distinction about something  that I had sped by.

I really like DISTINCTION-MAKING.  It’s how I can understand a concept. 

But back to other ways Paul could serve God:

Some ways to serve God

  • He could use his 2 hands and feet and go and do, or go and preach
  • He could use his mind and creatively fit analogies to his particular audience to make his words more penetrating
  • Or he could  serve God with his possessions

Personally, I would have probably substituted energy/life/work/hands for Paul’s choice of the term spirit.

Why bother take the time to think through all this?  For the happy benefit of having another question. When we ask ‘as opposed to what’, we are often led to other questions.  When we actively engage with ideas, we are enriched.

So now I get to ponder this: What does it mean to serve God with one’s spirit?

Now that’s a question worth chewing on!

Question:  What new idea have you acquired or absorbed recently that has made an impact on you?