Tag Archives: Israel

Watch out for sound byte – type thinking

2 Dec

Combat/combat……..Life/life………the Dead/the dead…….ISRAEL/Israel…..the Church/the church

Distinctions

We often fail to make distinctions and conflate multiple senses of a word into one.  This is called the Fallacy of Equivocation.  We commit these either out of ignorance or deliberately to confuse.

Kids are masters at the ‘art’ of equivocation or their other favorite technique, the fallacy aptly name, ‘Distinction without a Difference.’ You remember doing that yourself, right?  When you’d be called out by a parent for violating a house law.

“I wasn’t jumping up and down upstairs, I was only alternating my feet rapidly and firmly on the floor!”

But today, let’s focus on words that are analogous, but can mask intentions.  I thought about this listening to Mr. Obama defend his decision to send in some special forces soldiers who have ‘engaged in combat’.  He was being accused of contradicting his policy of NO MORE COMBAT TROOPS in Afghanistan.

That’s when it occurred to me that there is an explicit, all-out policy of ‘Combat’ as well as the kind of ‘combat’ that takes place when soldiers come under fire and defend themselves.  Given the difference between the two, we have the responsibility to pause to consider the surrounding circumstances and the speaker’s intentions.

What about the term, ‘Israel’?  Does this name refer to only one group of people, Jews from the Middle Eastern country?   Again, we have to consider different contexts.  At the simplest level, Israel IS a country. But that appellation also refers to the group of people who have been given a saving faith in Jesus. Paul, divinely inspired, writes in Romans 11:26, “….all Israel will be saved.”   One must take the time and…..

think before one parses out which concept Israel refers to – the literal or the metaphorical.

What about Life and life?  Again, one is literal (are you breathing?) and one could refer to a state of enthusiasm and ‘joie de vivre’ or even ‘eternal life’ in a Christian context.

And what about Jesus who challenges his hearers with this command, “Let the dead bury the dead!”  What are the two senses in which He employs this term?  The spiritually dead and the physically dead.

And finally the Church – well, we have the church building proper, the collective of worshippers, whether actual Christian or not and then all those who are referred to as the ‘true’ church, who belong to Jesus and will be with Him forever.

These examples might seem too obvious to even write about, but in today’s climate, I find myself often exasperated at how often people tear into others with a, “But he SAID…..” without having the courtesy to give someone the intellectual benefit of the doubt and actually ASK for clarification.

May we who claim to be logical practice courteous and respectful discourse!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Logical Gal – Multiple definitions can be confusing!

24 Sep

A recent devotional I read mentioned the Apostle Paul’s use of the term Israel to refer to FOUR different concepts.

I thought a brief account of how ‘Israel’ is employed would serve as a useful reminder to clarify terms before jumping into a discussion/debate or argument with someone.

The first question ALWAYS to ask is: What do you mean by X?

Hebrew people

‘Tabletalk’ is a monthly magazine with articles and daily Bible teaching by Dr. R.C. Sproul. I’m a month behind, but the 18 August 2014 piece was based on some verses in Romans 11.  Dr. Sproul mentions that in Romans 9-11, Paul uses ‘Israel’ to describe 4 different groups of people (his exact words follow):

  • The group of ethnic Jews who have true faith in the Lord
  • The entire corporate nation that is made up of all ethic Jews, including those who do not trust in the Lord
  • Ethnic Jews who have not placed their faith in Jesus
  • And finally, the term Israel can also designate all of those who believe in Jesus, including both ethnic Jews and ethnic Gentiles

Just reading about these distinctions reinforced in MY mind how ‘nuanced’ the Bible is.  I’m beginning to realize that words in Scripture are often a shorthand description that needs to be amplified.  For example, I’ve often been puzzled by the first 4 words in Paul’s statement: To live is Christ and to die is gain. (Phil 1:21)

I now realize that we in contemporary America speak in an equally symbolic but well understood way when we announce boldly general statements such as:  “Gardening is my life” or some such thing.  So to say ‘to live is Christ’ would probably mean that Christ is the most important person and truth in my life and I base everything on Him.

If we invest the energy and time actually to think and ponder, we CAN deal with layered concepts that might at first seem to stretch us.

I’ll leave you with a puzzle to practice with, one that maybe you can unravel.  Just as there are equivocal definitions of the term Israel, there are several possibilities for the adjective ALL or EVERY……  I often hear people announce hyperbolically:

  • All of New York turned out for the parade
  • All the OTHER kids get to go to the party!
  • Everyone knows that…..

Here’s my challenge:  What does Paul mean when he boldly writes to the Christians in Rome – All Israel will be saved (Romans 11:26)

All Israel will be saved

Before we get into a theological back and forth, we had better work to clarify the following:

  1. which category of Israel is meant?
  2. what does ‘all’ really mean?
  3. and in what sense will that group be ‘saved’?

Only then can a discussion proceed!

Would that as a matter of course I could be so restrained in my conversations.

 

 

Logical Gal, Pinterest and the Hebrews

6 Dec

Today, let’s talk about conversions of propositions that begin with the quantifier ‘all’: 

Here’s a true or false question about a favorite hang-out place of many women: If it’s true that all classy gals who decorate their homes stylishly spend time on Pinterest….is it ALSO true that all those who spend time on Pinterest will decorate their homes stylishly?

No….this is because you cannot convert A statements

All S is P does NOT equate to All P is S

At best you can say: Some P is S so that in the above example, it would be true that:

Some of those who spend time on Pinterest are classy gals who decorate their homes stylishly

Don’t forget – it only takes ONE to have a SOME as a quantifier!

I read another useful example of the trap of converting A statements in an explanation about the name, “Son of Man”.  This was Jesus’ favorite title for himself.

The title actually comes from the book of Daniel in the Old Testament. Here was the statement that I read:

“(the Son of Man)..could represent Israel but Israel itself cannot be the son of man” (Tabletalk Magazine, devotion dated  5 Nov 2013) 

Apparently Jewish scholars like to plug in the nation of Israel as that which the Prophet Daniel referred to.  But given the limitations of conversion of propositions, one cannot do that.  Putting the above quote in logical form we have this:

All Son of Man is Israel

All Israel is the Son of Man

Just by looking at the 2nd proposition you can see the ‘switcheroo’ doesn’t work. 

Question:

Where have you encountered advertising or an argument whose weight rests shakily on an invalid conversion like these?