Tag Archives: Solomon

What do you talk most about?

27 Aug

I was thinking about my tendency to ‘evangelize’ or proclaim the merits of my latest interest, usually about nutrition. I’m growing aware of the possibility idolatry. My latest ‘passion’ is all things Keto.

While reading God’s word recently, He ‘pinged my conscious’ with this thought:

  • Maria, are you more interested in talking up a Keto way of life than in talking about me?

THAT got my attention.  “YES!”, I had to admit.  I do tend to follow a pattern of doing just that.  (Last winter and spring I was on a Vegan campaign!  Yes, go ahead and laugh!)

Joking aside, here’s the sober truth:

Our God speaks. He is alive.  He really exists. And his speech created something out of nothing and continues to create ALL things, just by the power of his word.

John 1:1 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.

Hebrews 11:3 By faith we understand that the universe was formed by God’s command, so that what is seen was not made out of what was visible.

Genesis 1:1-4 In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth.  The earth was without form and void, and darkness was over the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God was hovering over the face of the waters. And God said, “Let there be light,” and there was light.  And God saw that the light was good.

Hebrews 1:3 (Jesus) He is the radiance of the glory of God and the exact imprint of his nature, and he upholds the universe by the word of his power.

From just these 4 snapshots of God’s speech, the Bible confronts humanity with the FACT that words matter.  That words have power. How do we actually KNOW this?

We have God’s written words.  Our Creator has endowed mankind with the ability to speak, to write and to read.

Weighty implications follow. Consider this:

  • If God spoke the universe into existence,
  • If we are made in the image of the Creator God as written in Gen 1:26 (Then God said, “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.)
  • Then our words contain creative power.

Of course, we are mere reflectors of some of the grandeur of our God.  But the Bible DOES say we share some attributes of God and one day will we be MORE like God.

So, my question to myself is this.  “Maria, do you speak most about……”:

  • Maria?  what you are doing, thinking, experiencing, suffering.
  • politics?
  • your latest passion?

“Or do you talk MOSTLY about God?”

If I take 5 seconds and think rationally, I have to conclude that most of what I talk about to others is what Solomon called, “meaningless.”

Why meaningless?  because my ‘stuff’ and circumstances as well as the world’s temporal circumstances are ephemeral.  Only God endures forever.  Only God matters.  And only God satisfies.

The people I talk to each day at school, at church, at the grocery store, even at home with my husband…they are all hungry for something to hold on to.  I AM, TOO!  My Keto experience will vanish like a vapor.  The world’s leaders as well.  And my suffering. And these momentary afflictions are only significant in that they are planned by God as his ‘Individual Holiness Plan’ FOR me, to make me more like Jesus.

Look at how Jesus viewed the words from His Father:

John 17:8 For I have given them (his disciples) the words that you gave me, and they have received them and have come to know in truth that I came from you; and they have believed that you sent me.

May we all watch over our words, by God’s grace, and speak what matters most and gives LIFE, the truth that Jesus came from the Father. For us!

 

Logical Gal – ‘But it’s in the Bible!’

25 Mar

Polygamy in the bible

A discussion I overheard reminded me of a useful distinction, that of what is normative versus what is descriptive.  The term normative contains the concept of norms or prescribed ways of doing things.  Descriptive points to information, the way things are.

Logicians have a name for this error in reasoning, it’s called the Is-Ought Fallacy.  The thinking goes like this:

  • The way things ARE is the way they SHOULD be.

That’s just plain stupid. All one has to do is provide a counter-example.  Sex-trafficking is an unfortunate fact. Should that continue? Persecution of Christians is a fact….. genocide is a fact…bureaucratic waste is a fact.  Surely we don’t countenance those circumstances just because ‘that’s the way life is in 2015!’

An entire arena where these two concepts of what is descriptive (the way things are) versus what is normative (the way things ought to be) often gets muddled is the Bible.  Someone with an agenda of showing how the Bible is not relevant for contemporary culture might argue about one particular issue this way:

  • How come you’re so committed to marriage being a life-long covenant between one man and one woman?  Why even in the Bible some of those heroes of the faith were polygamous.  Didn’t the patriarch Abraham have multiply wives?  And what about his grandson Jacob?
  • Jesus didn’t own anything; therefore, neither should Christians!

If anything, the Bible unabashedly narrates shameful foibles, backsliding, and dysfunctional family sin.  And if that weren’t enough, we are served up accounts of evil kings and pompous religious leaders.  And on the other side, it IS true that the Bible gloriously showcases courageous acts of faith by men and women such as Gideon, Ruth, Paul and Mary as well as Jesus, the Son of God.  But does it necessarily follow that the Bible is telling us is ‘Be a Daniel, Be a Joshua, Be a Jesus’? Might the Bible through all these accounts be pointing to what God has done?  Yes, there are principles of righteous living that we can follow.  Nevertheless, we must be careful to sort out whom or what is being held up as part of the overall meta-narrative or grand story from actual commands that we are to follow.

A discerning reader will apply the correct lens when studying God’s Word.  Distinguishing whether a narrative is giving a rundown of what happened OR whether it is promoting a way of life or specific behavior is key.